SEGEI

Mentor of the Month

This month, we celebrate our amazing mentor T. Luna Imhotep who has been with the EMP doing great work with our mentees. Let’s meet her!

 

My name is T. or Luna, I’m from Atlanta by way of the midwestern United States. I graduated from Agnes Scott College with my B.A. in Religious Studies and Wake Forest University School of Divinity with my Master’s in Divinity (Theology and Ancient Near Eastern Religions).

I started focusing on Traditional African and Indigenous Spirituality and Sciences after graduating and realized this was a part of my life’s work. In 2017 I started my business focused on Holistic Health and Wellness in communities of color. I work with women, men and youth in the areas of Health, Spirituality and unveiling their unique purpose.

What are your hobbies/things you enjoy doing?

I love arts and crafts, being in nature, learning languages so I can meet new people, and books! I also love watching series and movies centered around Black, Brown and Queer stories.

What’s your view about mentorship and the EMP mentorship program?

I believe deeply in mentorship, especially for Black women. I’ve had the honor of great women mentors in my life and I aim to give that back as much as possible. I’m grateful to be a part of the EMP mentorship program not only to make my expertise and work available to other women internationally but also to learn from other powerful women. The EMP mentorship program is unique in that it allows us, mentors, to become mentored as well!

What project/s are you currently working on?

Thanks for asking!

I’m currently launching an online course called Black, Queer & Revolutionary which is an intersectional subject centered around empowering socially marginalized voices.

I’m also re-launching my practice as a Health & Wellness provider for Women’s Health, Birth Worker and tradition Keeper.

Who/what inspires you?

My Grandma, Maya Angelou, Iyanla Vanzant, Lisa Nichols, Caroline Myss to name a few.

What inspires me is knowing that I’m here to do my work to make sure future generations have more opportunities to thrive.

What is the biggest challenge you have faced and how did you get through?

Great question: the biggest challenge I’ve had to face was playing small because I feared outshining those around me. People pleasing and caring more about what others think is a harmful act of self-harm, which I’m constantly overcoming. How did I get through? I have to realize that I didn’t come here to play small and if that means losing certain relationships then it wasn’t sustainable in the first place.

What advice would you give to any young lady trying to figure out their path in life?

We all came here to give the world the gift of our purpose. Once you find that out, you’ll be unstoppable!

Be of service, but remember to receive service as well.

Fill your cup! Love and care for yourself first even if that means getting up early, it’s always worth it.

Remember that you came from an abundant Source. Don’t settle for things or people that don’t strengthen your Being. Patience is always worth it.

8.       Any other comment.

The EMP mentorship program is a blessing to us who give and receive, I’ve learned so much from Onyinye and the other amazing women along with the mentees.

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